Self and Social Insight (SaSI) Lab
SaSI Lab People
David Dunning

email:
fax:607.255.8433
phone:607.255.6391
address:211 Uris Hall
Cornell University
Department of Psychology
Ithaca, NY 14853

David Dunning - Vita
Professor of Psychology; currently on leave as a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (Stanford University)

David Dunning is a Professor of Psychology at Cornell University. An experimental social psychologist, Dr. Dunning is a fellow of both the American Psychological Society and the American Psychological Association. He has published over 75 scholarly journal articles, book chapters, and commentaries, and has been a visiting scholar at the University of Michigan, Yale University, the University of Cologne (Germany), and the University of Mannheim (Germany). He has also served as an associate editor of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology and is currently the Executive Officer of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

His work focuses primarily on the accuracy with which people view themselves and their peers. In his most widely-cited research, he showed that people tend to hold flattering opinions of themselves and their decisions that cannot be justified from objective evidence, work that has been featured in numerous newspapers (e.g., New York Times), magazines (e.g., U.S. News & World Report ), radio (e.g., National Public Radio), and television (e.g., CBS Early Show). It has even been mentioned in a Doonesbury cartoon.

This work on the self has been supported financially by the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Science Foundation, and was recently reviewed in his book Self-insight: Roadblocks and detours on the path to knowing thyself (2005, Psychology Press).

He has also published work on eyewitness identification, depression, motivated distortion in visual perception, stereotyping, and behavioral economics.

BA - Psychology (1982) - Michigan State University
PhD - Psychology (1986) - Stanford University



Selected Publications [All Publications]
Helzer, E.G. & Dunning, D. (In Press). Why and when peer prediction is superior to self-prediction: The weight given to future aspiration versus past achievement. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. [abstract]
Helzer, E.G. & Dunning, D. (In Press). On motivated reasoning and self-belief. In S. Vazire & T. D. Wilson (Eds.), Handbook of self-knowledge. New York: Guilford.
Balcetis, E. & Dunning, D. (In Press). Wishful Seeing: Motivational Influences on Visual Perception of the Physical Environment. In E. Balcetis & G. D. Lassiter (Eds.), The Social Psychology of Visual Perception. New York: Psychology Press.
Dunning, D. (In Press). My rather unknown piece about “unknown unknowns” and their role in self-insight. Most underappreciated: 50 prominent social psychologists talk about hidden gems. Cambridge, UK: Oxford University.
Dunning, D. & Fetchenhauer, D. (In Press). Trust as an expressive rather than an instrumental act. In S. Thye & E. Lawler (Eds.), Advances in group processes (vol. 27). New York: Emerald.
Van Boven, L., Loewenstein, G., Welch, E. & Dunning, D. (In Press). The illusion of courage: Underestimating the impact of fear of embarrassment on the self. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making.
Critcher, C.R., Helzer, E.G. & Dunning, D. (2011). Self-enhancement via redefinition: Defining social concepts to ensure positive views of self. In M. Alicke & C. Sedikides (Eds.), Handbook of Self-Enhancement and Self-Protection, (pp. 69-91). New York: The Guilford Press.
Balcetis, E. & Dunning, D. (2010). Wishful seeing: Desirable objects are seen as closer. Psychological Science, 21, 147-152. [reprints | abstract]
Critcher, C.R., Dunning, D. & Armor, D.A. (2010). When self-affirmations reduce defensiveness: Timing is key. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 36, 947-959. [reprints | abstract]
Dunning, D. (2010). Social Motivation. New York: Psychology Press.
Fetchenhauer, D. & Dunning, D. (2010). Why so cynical? Asymmetric feedback underlies misguided skepticism in the trustworthiness of others. Psychological Science, 21, 189-193. [reprints | abstract]
Critcher, C.R. & Dunning, D. (2009). Egocentric Pattern Projection: How Implicit Personality Theories Recapitulate the Geography of the Self. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 97(1), 1-16. [reprints | abstract]
Critcher, C.R. & Dunning, D. (2009). How chronic self-views influence (and mislead) selfassessments of performance: Self-views shape bottom-up experiences with the task. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 97(6), 931-945. [reprints | abstract]
Fetchenhauer, D. & Dunning, D. (2009). Do people trust too much or too little? Journal of Economic Psychology, 30, 263-276. [reprints | abstract]
Balcetis, E. & Dunning, D. (2008). A mile in moccasins: How situational experience reduces dispositionism in social judgment. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 34, 102-114. [reprints | abstract]
Balcetis, E., Dunning, D. & Miller, R.L. (2008). Do collectivists know themselves better than individualists? Cross-cultural studies of the holier than thou phenomenon. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95, 1252-1267. [reprints | abstract]
Carter, T.J. & Dunning, D. (2008). Faulty Self-Assessment: Why Evaluating One's Own Competence Is an Intrinsically Difficult Task. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 2(1), 346-360. [pdf | abstract | website]
Ehrlinger, J., Johnson, K.L., Banner, M., Dunning, D. & Kruger, J. (2008). Why the unskilled are unaware? Further explorations of (lack of) self-insight among the incompetent. Organizational Behavior and Organizational Decision Processes, 105, 98-121. [reprints | abstract]
Balcetis, E. & Dunning, D. (2007). Cognitive dissonance and the perception of natural environments. Psychological Science, 18, 917-921. [abstract]
Risen, J., Gilovich, T. & Dunning, D. (2007). One-shot illusory correlations and stereotype formation. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 33, 1492-1502. [reprints | abstract]
Balcetis, E. & Dunning, D. (2006). See what you want to see: Motivational influences on visual perception. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 91, 612-625. [abstract]
Epley, N. & Dunning, D. (2006). The mixed blessings of self-knowledge in behavioral prediction: Enhanced discrimination but exacerbated bias. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 32, 641-655. [reprints | abstract]
Caputo, D.D. & Dunning, D. (2005). What you don’t know: The role played by errors of omission in imperfect self-assessments. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 41, 488-505. [reprints | abstract]
Dunning, D. (2005). Self-Insight: Roadblocks and detours on the path toward knowing thyself. New York, NY: Psychology Press. [abstract | website]
Dunning, D., Heath, C. & Suls, J.M. (2004). Flawed self-assessment: Implications for Health, Education, and the Workplace. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 5(3), 69-106. [abstract | website]
Dunning, D., Johnson, K.L., Ehrlinger, J. & Kruger, J. (2003). Why people fail to recognize their own incompetence. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 12, 83-86. [reprints | abstract]
Ehrlinger, J. & Dunning, D. (2003). How chronic self-views influence (and potentially mislead) assessments of performance. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 5-17. [reprints | abstract]
Kruger, J. & Dunning, D. (2002). Unskilled and Unaware—But Why? A Reply to Krueger & Mueller. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82, 189-192.
Epley, N. & Dunning, D. (2000). Feeling "holier than thou": Are self-serving assessments produced by errors in self or social prediction? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79, 861-875. [reprints | abstract]
Kruger, J. & Dunning, D. (1999). Unskilled and Unaware of It: How Difficulties in Recognizing One’s Own Incompetence Lead to Inflated Self-Assessments. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 77, 1121-1134.
Helzer, E.G. & Dunning, D. (2014). Why and when peer prediction is superior to self-prediction: The weight given to future aspiration versus past achievement. (Under Review).
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